Returning to My Writing Practice

Returning to My Writing Practice

It’s sad that it’s taken a major crisis for me to turn back to what I love most––my daily writing practice. Not the writing that I do for others, for I am fortunate to be truly making my living as a writer. I’m speaking of the writing I do for me. The Coronavirus is...

Protecting My Space by Setting Expectations

The word space has been floating in my awareness for the few weeks. With its frequent appearance, it’s time to pay attention to these subtle nudges from the Universe.

These nudges have come out of my own mouth, from my accountability partner who needed to make space in her calendar and our meeting was one she could sacrifice to get some “breathing room,”  and from a mentor’s message during a group meditation where she asked us to consider the concept of making space to receive the answers to our questions. All of these and more have led to my musings.  Contemplating space was cause for me to reflect upon my living arrangements, the space in my calendar, between projects, in my budget, and in my overall day.

Twelve-Year Old-Girl Debuts Song About Bullying

Twelve-Year Old-Girl Debuts Song About Bullying

Twelve-year-old singer-songwriter, known as Melody, like too many girls, has witnessed painful amounts of bullying and unkindness by other girls. Originally, she used her musical and writing talents to defend others who have been bullied. Recently, Melody’s album, Girl Behind the Piano, was released and is receiving many accolades.

One song in particular speaks to the bullying between young women. “Shine Bright,” which she penned, co-produced, and recorded sends a strong message about being an individual and encourages girls to be real and like themselves. The chorus repeats, “cause her over there with the pretty plastic hair, she thinks I’m better in the dark…go ahead and stare, cause I know I’m better in the light.”

Taming the Anxiety Monster

Taming the Anxiety Monster

My mind whirled with all sort of scenarios of doom––becoming stuck in snow or careening off of the cliffs topped the list. I had to force myself to enjoy the beauty that surrounded me. The skies were blue, the sun shining brightly on the snow covered peaks, and there was very little traffic. When any car came at me from the opposite direction, I would check for evidence of snow––and saw none. I had forty-seven miles of winding roads ahead of me, and with each passing mile, I began to relax, just a little. I made a mental note of my supplies and knew even if I did get stuck, I’d be warm with my clothes, including my waders, tucked in the back. I had food and even a bottle of wine. I also had to remind myself that even if the car sputtered out (I have an older Suburu, purchased specifically for my mountainous treks), there were people who would help. I had to trust in humanity––and also my own preparations.  

The Path to Acceptance

The Path to Acceptance

As Nancy and I polished off the fries, and I ate the entire hamburger after intending to save half for the next day’s lunch, I had an insight: What if in the not too distant future, Nancy and I were sitting at a table with two men? But only after we fine-tuned our picker to accept nothing but the best. The near tears turned to laughter. We picture-painted our ideal man. Hers: Matthew Hussey. Mine: Darius Rucker. The laughter mixed with joy-filled tears as we imagined what an evening with them that might be like! After I returned home, I downloaded their photos and fused them together in a meme and texted it to Nancy. Digital vision boarding.